Low Dose Naltrexone

Low Dose Naltrexone

Low Dose Naltrexone

A drug prescribed as a treatment for a variety of diseases, including various types of cancers.


“Low Dose Naltrexone (LDN) may well be the most important therapeutic breakthrough in over fifty years. It provides a new, safe and inexpensive method of medical treatment by mobilizing the natural defenses of one’s own immune system…
David Gluck, MD


Study: Evidence suggests that naltrexone, when used in low dose (1.75-4.5mg), shows inhibitory properties at the opioid receptors enabling the body to increase the production of endogenous opioids (endorphins) along with upregulating the immune system 

Study:
LDN could broadly stimulate immune cells by blocking the binding of endogenous opioids and opioid receptors.
LDN could broadly stimulate immune cells by blocking the binding of endogenous opioids and opioid receptors.
LDN will play an important role in inflammation, autoimmune diseases and cancer.

Study: The results of increasing studies indicate that LDN exerts its immunoregulatory activity by binding to opioid receptors in or on immune cells and tumor cells. These new discoveries indicate that LDN may become a promising immunomodulatory agent in the therapy for cancer and many immune-related diseases.

Study: Low dose naltrexone (LDN) has been promising as a complementary medication for patients with a broad range of medical disorders. Although not a proven cure, evidence from clinical trials supports LDN as being a valuable adjunct for disorders in which the immune system plays a centralized role. Additionally, clinical trials have proposed a unique mechanism(s) allowing LDN to affect tumors including non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC) at the cellular level by augmenting the immune system.

Study: The authors, in a previous article, described the long-term survival of a man with pancreatic cancer and metastases to the liver, treated with intravenous alpha-lipoic acid and oral low-dose naltrexone (ALA/N) without any adverse effects. He is alive and well 78 months after initial presentation. Three additional pancreatic cancer case studies are presented in this article. At the time of this writing, the first patient, GB, is alive and well 39 months after presenting with adenocarcinoma of the pancreas with metastases to the liver. The second patient, JK, who presented to the clinic with the same diagnosis was treated with the ALA/N protocol and after 5 months of therapy, PET scan demonstrated no evidence of disease. The third patient, RC, in addition to his pancreatic cancer with liver and retroperitoneal metastases, has a history of B-cell lymphoma and prostate adenocarcinoma. After 4 months of the ALA/N protocol his PET scan demonstrated no signs of cancer. In summary, the integrative therapy described in this article may have the possibility of extending the life of a patient who is customarily considered terminal. This was accomplished with a program of an antioxidant that bears known antitumor activity (namely, ALA) and an opiate blockade agent that can stimulate an endogenous immune response.

Study: In this case report, we describe the treatment of a 64-year-old male patient diagnosed with metastatic renal cell carcinoma (RCC) in June of 2008. In spite of a left nephrectomy and the standard oncological protocols, the patient developed a solitary left lung metastasis that continued to grow. He was informed that given his diagnosis and poor response to conventional therapy, any further treatment would, at best, be palliative. The patient arrived at the Integrative Medical Center of New Mexico in August of 2010. He was in very poor health, weak, and cachectic. An integrative program-developed by one of the authors using intravenous (IV) α-lipoic acid, IV vitamin C, low-dose naltrexone, and hydroxycitrate, and a healthy life style program-was initiated. …After only a few treatments of IV α-lipoic acid and IV vitamin C, his symptoms began to improve, and the patient regained his baseline weight. His energy and outlook improved, and he returned to work. The patient had stable disease with disappearance of the signs and symptoms of stage IV RCC, a full 9 years following diagnosis, with a gentle integrative program, which is essentially free of side effects. As of November 2017 the patient feels well and is working at his full-time job

 


Adverse effects

Most LDN is prescribed at bedtime; however, if patients report nightmares, then taking the dose in the morning can be an alternative. Vivid dreams are the most commonly reported side effect in clinical trials but this seems to decrease after a few nights. Another less common side effect is headaches, but these are reported as mild in severity. No side effects of stomach ulcers, renal impairment, or interference with anticlotting medications have been reported in research. Source: Natural Medicine Journal


Where can I get this treatment and more information?
lowdosenaltrexone.org
LDN Science
LDN Research Trust
Synergy Healthcare

Video

Warning
1. Some cancer therapies can conflict with others. Do not start ANY therapy without consulting your doctor to ensure it’s safe and beneficial to do so.
2. Just because any given therapy worked for someone else does not necessarily mean it will work for you.
3. Although there are many viable alternative cancer treatments, there isn’t a “best” treatment for a certain type or stage of cancer.

Please share this page to help others