Overall Wellbeing

Overall Wellbeing

Ayurveda
Ayurveda is a healing system that treats the whole person – the integration of body, mind, and spirit – rather than simply treating individual symptoms. Ayurvedic medicine uses a variety of products and practices. Ayurvedic products can be made either of herbs only or a combination of herbs, metals, minerals, or other materials in an Ayurvedic practice called rasa shastra.

Faith Healing
There are two types of prayer – that which the individual does for themselves, and that which is received – either knowingly or not – from others. Numerous studies show that in the former case, those who pray contemplatively or meditate – in both Western and Eastern traditions – can positively influence their health.

Fasting
What we eat and when we eat it can affect the way our bodies absorb and react to medications, sometimes to the extent of altering treatment outcomes. Food intake, therefore, is an important variable when determining the optimal treatment for many diseases. Cancer researchers are now exploring whether manipulating food intake could help reduce the side effects of some treatments or make them more effective.

Hands-on Healing
Often known as spiritual healing, it is not to be confused with spiritualism. You may find healers who work with what they call “spirit guides” but mainstream healing is not a religion, but a therapy that harnesses the energy around and within us to combat disease. A healer does not heal of himself; he is simply a channel through whom the energy flows when he is at work.

Myers Cocktail
The “Myers Cocktail” is an intravenous vitamin and mineral protocol developed in the 1970s by physician John Myers at Johns Hopkins University in Baltimore, Maryland. Myers pioneered the use of intravenous vitamins and minerals as part of the overall treatment of a wide variety of medical conditions, including cancer treatment alternatives.

Naturopathy
A system of disease prevention and treatment that avoids drugs and surgery. Naturopathy is based on the use of natural agents such as air, water, light, heat, and massage to help the body heal itself. It also uses herbal products, nutrition, acupuncture, and aromatherapy as forms of treatment.

Physical Exercise
DAILY light to medium exercise was of significant benefit to cancer patients. Women with breast cancer who do daily exercise survive 50 per cent longer than women doing none. Research has found no harmful effects on patients with cancer from moderate exercise and, in fact, has demonstrated that those who exercised regularly had 40% to 50% less fatigue, the primary complaint during treatment.

Tai Chi
Tai chi is often described as “meditation in motion,” but it might well be called “medication in motion.” There is growing evidence that this mind-body practice, which originated in China as a martial art, has value in treating or preventing many health problems. Although tai chi is slow and gentle and doesn’t leave you breathless, it addresses the key components of fitness — muscle strength, flexibility, balance, and, to a lesser degree, aerobic conditioning.

TCM
Traditional Chinese medicine (TCM) originated in ancient China and has evolved over thousands of years. TCM practitioners use herbal medicines and various mind and body practices, such as acupuncture, tai chi, massage (Tui na), exercise (qigong), and dietary therapy to treat or prevent health problems.

Therapeutic Touch
Therapeutic Touch is based on the belief that “energy fields” (also known as chi, qi, ki or prana) surround and penetrate the human body. Therapeutic Touch practitioners are taught that disease or disorder can be detected in the energy system and affected therapeutically by smoothing or relieving congested energy.

Tibetan Medicine

Tibetan medicine incorporates many lifestyle practices designed to promote health, such as yoga, meditation, compassion, lovingkindness, and Mindfulness-Based Stress Reduction. A great deal of research is being published about these practices, with positive results.

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