Radically Change Your Diet

Radically change your diet


Cancer Stem Cells are the only cells that can give rise to new tumors. There is no known way of eliminating them. This is why cancers usually recur (come back). However, Dr Young S. Kim, a scientist at the National Cancer Institute in the US showed that poor diet causes cancer stem cells to regrow while a good diet containing certain bioactive compounds could stop that regrowth.

This American Cancer Society study found that Colorectal cancer patients who improve their diet and lifestyle survive longer with a 42 per cent reduced risk of death than those who do not make the changes.

Dr. Dean Ornish MD, Clinical Professor of Medicine at the University of California, San Francisco conducted a study with 93 patients. It proved that it’s possible to halt the progression of early stage prostate cancer with a plant-based diet, along with daily exercise and stress reduction.

Numerous scientific studies have confirmed that the Western Diet high in meat, dairy and processed/ fast foods is one of the leading causes of cancer.


Thankfully, there are a number of diets that can help prevent (and treat) cancer. These include a Whole Food, Plant Based Diet, Vegetarian Diet and the Mediterranean Diet.

Ideally you should eat a low fat, whole foods, plant based diet.

This will ensure that you exclude the foods that feed your cancer, while eating foods that strengthen your immune system.

Benefits of a Whole-Food, Plant-Based Diet

A diet high in animal-based and highly processed foods makes people sick and overweight. But many of these sicknesses can be prevented, halted, and often reversed by eating a whole-food, plant-based diet. A whole-food, plant-based diet has been shown to:

  • Lower cholesterol, blood pressure, and blood sugar
  • Reverse or prevent heart disease
  • Prevent and reverse obesity
  • Lower risk of cancer and diabetes
  • Slow the progression of certain types of cancer
  • Improve symptoms of rheumatoid arthritis
  • Improve overall quality of life

Eat organic foods to avoid herbicides, fungicides, pesticides and chemical fertilizers.

Eat a giant salad every day.

Eat lots of immune-boosting, anticancer foods such as:

Carrots
Beets
Celery
Garlic
Onions
Leeks
Green Tea
Broccoli (especially broccoli sprouts)
Brussels Sprouts
Cauliflower
Kale
Cabbage
Green Beans
Spinach
Beetroot

Tip: Juicing vegetables helps to increase intake.

Cut out cancer promoting foods:
No meat products of any kind
No dairy products of any kind
No processed or artificial foods
No white sugar
No biscuits, buns, cakes, tarts etc
No white bread or white rice
No oils (corn, safflower, olive, etc. oils) they encourage tumors to grow faster

Starve Your Cancer

Remove all animal products (meat and dairy) and sugar from your diet.

The link between the consumption of animal protein and cancer became global news more than a decade ago with the publication of The China Study (The Most Comprehensive Study of Nutrition Ever Conducted and the Startling Implications For Diet, Weight Loss, and Long-Term Health). The results led researchers to conclude that overall, the closer people came to an all plant-based diet, the lower their risk for chronic disease. A diet rich in animal and dairy products was shown to stimulate cancer cell growth. Cancer cells need protein to divide and flourish. Cut off the supply of animal protein and you can stop the growth and spread of cancer cells. However, these facts have been largely ignored by the medical profession which still relies on surgery, radiotherapy and chemotherapy to fight the disease.

Radical Remission: Surviving Cancer Against All Odds
Kelly Turner, PhD, a researcher who specializes in integrative oncology, studied one hundred cancer survivors and analysed over one thousand cases of people who experienced a “radical remission” from “incurable” cancer. She found that these people did not sit around waiting for a miracle, but made significant changes in their lives. Dr Kelley found nine healing factors common among all of the cases she studied. These nine key factors are:

  1. Radically changing your diet
  2. Taking control of your health
  3. Following your intuition
  4. Using herbs and supplements
  5. Releasing suppressed emotions
  6. Increasing positive emotions
  7. Embracing social support
  8. Deepening your spiritual connection
  9. Having strong reasons for living

See more at www.RadicalRemission.com.

Dr John Kelly

Dr John Kelly

Dr John Kelly, a Dublin GP helped his patients survive cancer with an animal protein free diet diet. In his book Stop Feeding Your Cancer Dr Kelly provides case histories of a number of his patients who survived deadly cancers by adopting an animal protein free diet (no meat, no dairy produce). He kept a detailed record of the results over a period of nine years, showing that the diet can switch cancer growth off, reversing it into a dormant state, and effectively cure the patient.

Animal Protein and IGF-1 (increased cancer risk)
When we ingest proteins that have a higher proportion of the essential amino acids (which is a characteristic of animal protein), it results in our bodies producing higher levels of the hormone insulin-like growth factor-1 (IGF-1). This hormone stimulates cell division and growth in both healthy and cancer cells and, for this reason, having higher circulating levels of IGF-1 has been consistently associated with increased cancer risk, proliferation, and malignancy. (Source: Forks Over Knives).

A number of other studies found diet could improve outcomes for breast, colon and prostate cancer.

A 2014 study shows that (a) high protein intake is linked to increased cancer, diabetes, and overall mortality (death). (b) High IGF-1 levels increased the relationship between mortality and high protein. (c) Plant-derived proteins are associated with lower mortality than animal-derived proteins

A 2014 meta-analysis found that a low-fat diet reduced the risk of recurrence of breast cancer by 23% and all cause mortality of breast cancer by 17%.

A 2007 study concluded that a higher intake of a Western diet may be associated with a higher risk of recurrence and death among patients with stage III colon cancer treated with surgery and adjuvant chemotherapy.

A 2014 study noted that high intake of dietary fat, especially, high intake of animal and saturated fats, may be associated with increased prostate cancer risk. In contrast, a low-fat diet, specifically low in saturated fat, may be beneficial for prostate cancer survivors by reducing tumor angiogenesis and cancer recurrence. The insulin-like growth factor (IGF)/Akt signaling pathway appears to be the key pathway moderating dietary fat intake and prostate cancer development and progression.

A 2005 study by Dean Ornish et al concluded that Intensive lifestyle changes may affect the progression of early, low grade prostate cancer in men.

Another study by Ornish et al suggests that intensive nutrition and lifestyle changes may modulate gene expression in the prostate.

A four-month 2001 study of 10 men with recurrent prostate cancer reported that a low-fat, plant-based diet combined with stress reduction appeared to slow the rise in PSA levels.

A 2001 study of 13 overweight men reported that an 11-day regimen of a low-fat, high-fiber diet plus exercise improved the ability of blood samples to inhibit the growth of LNCaP prostate cancer cells.

A 2003 study of 34 healthy men reported that blood samples from men who exercised regularly and from men who followed a low-fat, high-fiber diet slowed the growth of LNCaP prostate cancer cells, but blood from sedentary men following typical American diets did not. Further experiments suggested that diet and exercise may exert their effect in a similar way, by reducing levels of insulin-like growth factor-1 (IGF-1).

A 2003 study of 12 men who exercised regularly and 10 sedentary men found that blood from the exercisers had lower levels of IGF-1 and was better able to reduce the growth of LNCaP prostate cancer cells. Additional experiments suggested that exercise may act in part by increasing a protein called p53, which protects cells from the effects of damaged DNA.

A 2004 Harvard study of 675 men with treated prostate cancer linked a high consumption of fish with a reduced risk of recurrent or progressive cancer.

A 2005 study of 49 men with rising PSAs after surgery or radiation treatment suggested that soy-based dietary supplements might slow the rise in PSA levels.

A 2006 study of 46 men who had rising PSAs after surgery or radiation treatment for early prostate cancer reported that pomegranate juice slowed the rise in PSA levels.

A 2006 Harvard study of 1,202 men with localized prostate cancer suggested that the consumption of fish and tomato sauce may offer some protection against disease progression.

A 2006 study of 14 men with recurrent prostate cancer suggested that a plant-based diet and stress reduction might slow the rise in PSA levels.
(Source: Harvard Medical School)

See also Forks Over Knives

Vegetarians Are Better Off

Source: The Physicians Committee for Responsible Medicine

All the evidence points to a low-fat, high-fiber diet that includes a variety of fruits, vegetables, whole grains, and beans, as being the best for cancer prevention. Not surprisingly, vegetarians, whose diets easily meet these requirements, are at the lowest risk for cancer. Vegetarians have about half the cancer risk of meat-eaters.11

Vegetarians have higher blood levels of beta-carotene. They consume more vitamin C, beta-carotene, indoles, and fiber than meat-eaters. Vegetarians also have stronger immune systems. German researchers recently discovered that vegetarians have more than twice the natural killer cell activity of meat-eaters.12 Natural killer cells are specialized white blood cells that attack and neutralize cancer cells. Also, vegetarians tend to eat more soy products than meat-eaters. Soybeans contain many substances that are anticarcinogens, including lignans and phytoestrogens. A diet that is rich in soybeans may be one reason for the lower incidence of breast cancer in Asia.

Conclusion

A cancer prevention diet is one that is high in fiber, low in fat (especially animal fat), and includes generous portions of fruits and vegetables. It also minimizes or excludes alcohol. The best diets are pure vegetarian diets.

Mediterranean Diet

Source: Memorial Sloan Kettering Cancer Center

The Mediterranean diet is associated with a reduction in the incidence of many diseases, but may not be suitable for everyone.

A Mediterranean diet is commonly consumed in regions that border the Mediterranean Sea. It consists of a variety of fruits, vegetables, cereals, legumes, poultry, fish, nuts, seeds, olive oil, and moderate intake of red wine with meals. Epidemiological studies show that the Mediterranean diet is a model of healthy eating that contributes to better health and overall quality of life, and can reduce the risk of heart disease, stroke, diabetes, certain cancers, and death.

Mediterranean Diet for Cancer Prevention

Source: Natural Medicine Journal
By Michelle Qaqundah, ND, FABNO

Cancer prevention
Overall incidence of cancer is lower in Mediterranean countries compared to the United States, United Kingdom, and the Scandinavian countries.2 Large prospective observational studies have linked the Mediterranean diet to this decreased cancer incidence. For example, the MOLI-SANI Project transformed the Molise region of Italy into a “scientific laboratory” of data collection, specifically looking at cardiovascular disease and cancer in relationship to the Mediterranean diet. Other large observational studies, such as the European Prospective Investigation into Cancer and Nutrition (EPIC) and the National Institutes of Health-American Association for Retired Persons (NIH-AARP) Diet and Health study, have subanalyzed the data, looking at the Mediterranean diet, cancer markers, incidence, and mortality. The Greek cohort of the EPIC study (N=25,623) was followed for 7.9 years. Investigators found a 12% reduction in cancer incidence for every 2-point increase in the 10-point Mediterranean diet adherence scale.3 The NIH-AARP Diet and Health study (N=380,296) found a 17% and 12% decreased cancer mortality in men and women following the Mediterranean diet after 5 years of follow-up.4

Mediterranean diet and cancer risk.

Source: PubMed

Abstract

Various aspects of the Mediterranean diet are considered favourable with regard to cancer risk. These aspects were analysed using data from a series of case-control studies conducted in northern Italy between 1983 and 2001 on over 12,000 cases of 20 cancer sites and 10,000 controls. For most epithelial cancers, the risk decreased with increasing vegetable and fruit consumption, with odds ratios (OR) between 0.3 and 0.7 for the highest versus the lowest tertile. Subjects reporting frequent red meat intake showed ORs above unity for several common neoplasms. Conversely, fish (and consequently, n-3 fatty acids) tended to be another favourable dietary indicator. Wholegrain food intake was related to reduced risk of several types of cancer, particularly of the upper digestive tract, probably on account of its high fibre content. Fibres were in fact found to be protective with regard to colorectal and other selected cancers. In contrast to wholegrain, refined grain intake, and consequently glycaemic load, was associated with an increased risk of different types of cancer, including those of the upper digestive tract, colorectum, breast and endometrium. These results thus suggest that a low-risk diet for cancer entails increasing vegetables and fruit, reducing meat, but also refined carbohydrate consumption. Furthermore, olive oil and other unsaturated fats, which may be a unique common characteristic of the Mediterranean diet, should be preferred to animal and saturated fats. A score summarizing the major characteristics of the Mediterranean diet was inversely and consistently related to the risk of selected cancer sites. Regular consumption of pizza, one of the most typical Italian foods, showed a reduced risk of digestive tract cancers. Pizza could however simply be an indicator of a typical Italian diet.

Diet based health programmes


Ornish Lifestyle Medicine

Source: https://www.ornish.com/proven-program/nutrition/

Ornish Lifestyle Medicine has been scientifically proven to reverse the progression of even severe coronary heart disease, type 2 diabetes, hypercholesterolemia, and high blood pressure as well as to slow, stop, or even reverse the progression of early-stage prostate cancer in a series of randomized controlled trials published in leading peer-reviewed journals.

We also found that changing lifestyle changes your genes—turning on protective genes and turning off genes that promote inflammation, oxidative stress, and oncogenes that promote prostate cancer, breast cancer, and colon cancer—over 500 genes in only 3 months.

Ornish diet: does it work?

Source: Cam-Cancer.org

The Ornish diet and lifestyle modification programme was tested in a randomized trial in 93 men with early biopsy-proven prostate cancer  who had chosen not to undergo any conventional treatment 3.

After 1 year, intensive lifestyle changes resulted in a PSA decrease of 4% and an inhibition of the serum-stimulated growth of LNCaP cells of 70%, compared to a 6% increase of PSA and only 9% LNCaP growth inhibition in the control group (not following the Ornish diet and lifestyle modification programme, but making lifestyle changes as advised by their physician).

None of the 44 patients in the treatment group, but 6 of the 49 control patients had to undergo conventional treatment (e.g., radical prostatectomy, radiotherapy, or androgen deprivation therapy) due to an increase in PSA and/or progression of disease on magnetic resonance imaging.

After 2 years, 2 of the 43 experimental patients and 13 of the 49 control patients had undergone conventional prostate cancer treatment; at this time point no significant differences in PSA change were found between the experimental and control patients (excluding patients who had undergone conventional treatment), and adherence to the intensive lifestyle changes remained high (95%) 10.

Pritikin Diet

Source: Pritikin Longevity Center

  • Reduce Key Risk Factors For Breast and Prostate Cancer

    Several studies have found that adopting the Pritikin Program reduced key risk factors for breast and prostate cancer. Journal of the National Cancer Institute, 86: 1419, 1994; Nutrition and Cancer, 31: 127,1998; Nutrition and Cancer, 38: 158, 2000; The Journal of Urology, 166: 1185, 2001.

  • Retard the Growth of Prostate Cancer Cells

    In in vitro testing, the serum of men following the Pritikin Program was found to retard the growth of prostate cancer cells and induce cancer cell death (apoptosis). In pre-Pritikin serum, fewer than 3% of prostate cancer cells showed apoptosis. In post-Pritikin serum (after 11 days at the Pritikin Center), almost 40% of cancer cells were on their way to death. In the serum of men following the Pritikin Program for an average 14 years, more than 50% of the cancer cells were in apoptosis. Cancer Causes & Control, 13: 929, 2002.

  • Retard the Growth of Breast Cancer Cells

    In laboratory testing, and using women’s pre- and post-Pritikin serum, the Pritikin Program significantly reduced breast tumor cell growth in three different cell lines (reductions of 7%, 10%, and 19%) and increased death (apoptosis) of cancer cells by 20%, 23%, and 30%. Nutrition and Cancer, 55: 28, 2006.

Other investigations

Source: Harvard Medical School

…other investigations, though smaller and shorter, tend to support the possibility that lifestyle changes may slow the growth of prostate cancer cells. Here are some examples.

  • A four-month 2001 study of 10 men with recurrent prostate cancer reported that a low-fat, plant-based diet combined with stress reduction appeared to slow the rise in PSA levels.
  • A 2001 study of 13 overweight men reported that an 11-day regimen of a low-fat, high-fiber diet plus exercise improved the ability of blood samples to inhibit the growth of LNCaP prostate cancer cells.
  • A 2003 study of 34 healthy men reported that blood samples from men who exercised regularly and from men who followed a low-fat, high-fiber diet slowed the growth of LNCaP prostate cancer cells, but blood from sedentary men following typical American diets did not. Further experiments suggested that diet and exercise may exert their effect in a similar way, by reducing levels of insulin-like growth factor-1 (IGF-1).
  • A 2003 study of 12 men who exercised regularly and 10 sedentary men found that blood from the exercisers had lower levels of IGF-1 and was better able to reduce the growth of LNCaP prostate cancer cells. Additional experiments suggested that exercise may act in part by increasing a protein called p53, which protects cells from the effects of damaged DNA.
  • A 2004 Harvard study of 675 men with treated prostate cancer linked a high consumption of fish with a reduced risk of recurrent or progressive cancer.
  • A 2005 study of 49 men with rising PSAs after surgery or radiation treatment suggested that soy-based dietary supplements might slow the rise in PSA levels.
  • A 2006 study of 46 men who had rising PSAs after surgery or radiation treatment for early prostate cancer reported that pomegranate juice slowed the rise in PSA levels.
  • A 2006 Harvard study of 1,202 men with localized prostate cancer suggested that the consumption of fish and tomato sauce may offer some protection against disease progression.
  • A 2006 study of 14 men with recurrent prostate cancer suggested that a plant-based diet and stress reduction might slow the rise in PSA levels.

Glucose feeds cancer

Dr. Thomas Graeber, a professor of molecular and medical pharmacology, has investigated how glucose affects cancer cells. In research published in 2012 in the journal Molecular Systems Biology, Graeber and his colleagues demonstrate that depriving cancer cells of glucose leads to cancer cell death.

“During the last 10 years I have worked with more than 500 cancer patients as director of nutrition for Cancer Treatment Centers of America in Tulsa, Okla. It puzzles me why the simple concept ‘sugar feeds cancer’ can be so dramatically overlooked as part of a comprehensive cancer treatment plan.”

Patrick Quillin, PHD, RD, CNS

20 links between common sugar and cancer


There certainly is evidence that glucose and cancer are linked, both directly and indirectly via insulin. Lots of it. Cancer cells derive their energy from an anaerobic fermentation process known as glycolysis. Glycolysis requires glucose; without it most cancer cells simply lack the metabolic flexibility to survive.

  1. In the Journal of Clinical Investigation, scientists showed increased glycolysis (due to increased use of glucose as a fuel) actually caused cancer to form.
  2. Dr. Craig Thompson, President and Chief Executive of Memorial Sloan Kettering Cancer Center has shown that a gene, AKT, promotes cancer by signaling what a cancer cell should ‘eat’ in about 80 per cent of cancers. “When an AKT protein is placed inside a cell, it just stuffs itself with glucose, and makes as many copies of itself as possible”.
  3. The Mayo Clinic states clearly on its website that “There is some evidence that consuming large amounts of sugar is associated with an increased risk of certain cancers.”
  4. American Medical School Johns Hopkins has researched colorectal cancer and sugar They showed that starving patients of sugar increases survival.
  5. Colorectal cancer risk is linked to lowered levels of certain strains of clostridia, a group of bacteria that are known to metabolise glucose. Poor sugar control has been consistently linked with cancer and people with Type-2 diabetes have higher risk of cancer.
  6. The University of Minnesota in a 2013 study showed that post-menopausal soda-drinking women had a higher risk of type 1 endometrial cancer.
  7. People with the highest blood sugar levels develop more cancers, and people with cancer and high blood sugar levels survive least.
  8. Oncologists know of cancer cells’ avarice for glucose, only too well. They use glucose with a radiological dye in PET scans, The feeding frenzy on the glucose allows the dye to enter only cancer cells.
  9. It is a fact that cancer cells have much higher numbers of insulin receptor sites than healthy cells have, because the cancer cells need much higher levels of glucose if they are to grow rapidly.
  10. Metformin, a drug used with Type-2 diabetes to lower serum glucose levels has been shown to be extremely helpful in cancer treatment. A meta-analysis of 20 research papers by Dr. Ming Yin et al in The Oncologist stated the metformin helped ‘increase survival times of patients’. Diabetics who take metformin are much less likely to develop cancer than those who don’t. An herbal constituent,
  11. Cutting blood glucose reduces insulin levels and this in turn reduces inflammation in the body because insulin is a proven driver of the Cox-2 inflammation pathway. Cancers love inflammation; it helps them spread.
  12. In 2010 research conducted by Dr. Anthony Hearney of UCLA’s Jonsson Cancer Center, studies on pancreatic cells showed that exposure to both glucose and fructose, made cancer cells divide and proliferate, but fructose (fizzy soft drinks use High Fructose Corn Syrup) made them divide much more rapidly.
  13. Conversely, inhibiting glucose uptake has been shown to block cancer cell development. Researchers from the Biochemistry Dept. of Oxford University used a sugar extract from avocados (mannoheptulose); this inhibited glucose uptake by between 25 and 75%
  14. As long ago as 1973 research showed that sugar consumption could block the action of the immune system from attacking cancer cells.
  15. A report in the American Journal of Public Health confirmed this, showing that consuming sugary drinks drastically depresses the immune system.
  16. Three to five day fasts has been shown by experts such as Dr. Valter Longo of the University of Southern California, San Diego to boost the immune system while stopping the progression of cancer by suppressing blood glucose, insulin and growth hormone levels.
  17. In animal studies, short-term fasting alone delayed tumour growth to the same extent as treatment with the drug cyclophosphamide. Indeed, there are numerous studies on how fasting makes chemotherapy work better while protecting healthy cells.
  18. The Oncologist magazine in the UK featured an editorial from an expert Detroit oncologist Andrew Turrisi, commenting on research showing that using calorie restriction (cutting carbohydrate calories by 15%) ‘made radiotherapy work better’ in patients.
  19. Human Clinical Trials are also underway in America with a Ketogenic diet, where no non-fibre carbohydrate, little protein but very high good fat levels are consumed. This induces ketosis in healthy cells (ketosis is the burning of fat instead of carbs). Since cancer cells are inflexible, they cannot use fats and ketosis, and so they wither and die. ‘Abnormal cancer metabolism creates a glycolytic-dependency which can be exploited by lowering glucose availability to the tumor’. Results using mice have already shown far greater survival times:
  20. Oncologists at St. Thomas’ Hospital, London currently use ‘The Atkins Diet’ with patients who have brain tumours and are claiming much improved survival times. Meanwhile, research has shown metformin improves the effectiveness of Temozolomide, the brain tumour drug. The brain is particularly susceptible to glucose.

    Source: CancerActive.com (Edited here for brevity)


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